1. Satay

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Meat on a stick is always delicious, so throw in some unique Malaysian seasoning for a complex and delicious taste for this simple dish.

Get the recipe here.

2. Wan Tan Mee

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Wan Tan Mee is a Malaysian staple that can be eaten for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. For the most authentic experience, try it chicken feet and sauce.

Get the recipe here.

3. Sambal Udang

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Shrimp is a staple in Malaysian cuisine, and it’s the base for the popular dish, Sambal Udang. Flavoured with tamarind and shrimp paste, the dish has a classic Malaysian flavour and is served over rice.

Get the recipe here.

4. Char Kway Teow

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This simple stir-fry is a street vendor favourite in Malaysia. Fry up some chicken, noodles, and veg with chili prawn paste for this signature dish.

Get the recipe here.

5. Kuih Dadar

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Malaysian desserts have a unique flavour and are often coloured to match the surprising and exotic tastes. Kuih Dadar is a crepe sweetened with pendan (the leaf from a screwpine tree) like most traditional Malaysian desserts, and stuffed with coconut flesh and palm sugar.

Get the recipe here.

6. Udang Galah Goreng

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Fried prawns over sautéed vegetables is flat out yummy. This simple dish is spicy and sweet in perfect balance, and can be served over rice or on its own.

Get the recipe here.

7. Pie Tee

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Pie Tee or “top hats” are the only appetiser you’ll ever want to serve again. While the shells are difficult to make, the filling pays off, creating an amazing burst of fresh and complex flavour in a single bite.

Get the recipe here.

8. Mee Goreng

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This spicy noodle dish is a variation on Chinese chow mein and is popular in Malasia, Indonesia, and Singapore. It’s a common menu item for Malaysian street vendors, and is often served with a fried or poached egg over top.

Get the recipe here.

9. Yong Tau Foo

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Fried fish and bean curd are smothered with fish paste and poached in chicken broth for one-of-a-kind Malaysian recipe.

Get the recipe here.

10. Popiah

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Part burrito and part egg-roll, you can’t go wrong with popiah. The thin and chewy dough is stuffed with a variety of goodies: veg, meat, and rice, and is typically dipped in a sweet bean sauce.

Get the recipe here.

11. Rojak Buah

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A rare Malaysian vegetarian treat, Rojak Buah is a tasty combination of sweet and sour flavours. Fruit is dressed in a sweet and spicy sauce and tossed with sesame seeds for this delicious starter.

Get the recipe here.

12. Kari Kapitan

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This famous dry Malaysian curry is full of flavour and history. A legend says the dish got its name when a ship cook was asked what’s for dinner and answer “Curry, Kapitan!” Shrimp paste gives the dish its Malaysian flavour, and it’s a good dish for dieters – with less sauce, there’s less need for rice!

Get the recipe here.

13. Nasi Lemak

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This classic Malaysian rice dish is cooked in coconut milk and served with a cocktail of Malay spices, giving it a unique and complex flavour. Nuts, cucumber, and boiled eggs make delightful and yummy garnishes.

Get the recipe here.

14. Murtabak

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This thin pastry stuffed with minced meat and served with pickled chutney is popular across South East Asia.

Get the recipe here.

15. Kai See Hor Fun

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Malaysian chicken soup for the soul, Kai See Hor Fun is a comforting dish with a touch of signature Malaysian spice.

Get the recipe here.

16. Pasembur

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This hot salad his a singular flavour, using the tamarind and prawn in classic Malaysian cuisine fashion. Vegetables and potatoes are topped with a thick dressing made from sweet potato and tamarind and served with fried prawn fritters.

Get the recipe here.

17. Assam Laksa

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This delicious noodle bowl is served with boiled mackerel and an abundance of spices. A variety of sweet and spicy flavours and a rainbow of colours keep it interesting.

Get the recipe here.

18. Ikan Assam Pedas

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This hot and sour fish soup packs a punch, and while scrumptious and spicy, it’s not for the faint of heart. The soup is often prepared with a full fish head floating around in it.

Get the recipe here.

19. Ondeh-Ondeh

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This sweet Malaysian treat packs a surprise in the centre. Made from sweet potato or rice flour, these yummy balls are sweetened with pendan and smothered in grated coconut.

Get the recipe here.

20. Ayam Masak Merah

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For a Malaysian twist of classic curry, try Ayam Maskak Merah. The dish incorporates the sweetness of the popular pendan leaf for a unique and layered flavour.

Get the recipe here.

21. Otak-Otak

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Fish and spice paste are packed inside a banana leaf and barbecued for this crazy good and unexpected dish.

Get the recipe here.

22. Bak Kut Teh

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The name translates to “Pork Bone Tea Soup,” which pretty much covers what the dish consists of. Broth is loaded with pork ribs and mushrooms and infused with herbs and spices for this warm and hearty soup.

Get the recipe here.

If you’re dying for more Malaysian, check out Malaysia Kitchen for more recipes, specialty ingredients, and finding the best Malaysian takeaways in London

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